The ability to incorporate document management functionality within Dynamics CRM/Dynamics 365 for Enterprise (CRM/D365E) is one of the ways that the application integrates neatly with other products in the Microsoft “stack”, giving you the ability to drive further benefit from your existing CRM/D365E deployment. Documents that specifically concern a particular record can be stored within SharePoint and accessed via a few clicks within the application, allowing for quicker collaboration and visibility behind a specific contact, business or sales opportunity. By leveraging the full functionality of SharePoint alongside this, businesses can begin to take advantage of features such as document history, check in/check out capability and the ability to access SharePoint content via the OneDrive desktop client, negating the need to work solely within a web browser to access your documents.

When you are first getting to grips with Document Management, you may come across an oddity with no apparent way of resolving: GUID names are appended onto the names of your SharePoint folders:

There is an understandable reason why this is done (which will be discussed later on in this post), but the folder names can appear jarring and nonsensical to end users of the application. Fortunately, there is a way in which you can change the global setting for this within the application, but it requires making some modifications to your CRM/D365E Organisations global settings – one of those changes that are simple to do if you know how to, but more complex if you don’t ūüôā

CRM’s/D365E’s Organisation settings are not exposed within an accessible format natively within the application. To make changes to these settings within the application, the best tool available for both Online and On-Premise versions of the application is the Organization Settings Editor. I have previously discussed how to install and use this tool on the blog, and it is a really straightforward way of updating some of the CRM’s/D365E’s more obscure settings to suit your preferences. The setting that controls all of this is this is the aptly named¬†CreateSPFoldersUsingNameandGuid, which needs to be set to¬†false. Once this is configured, all newly created SharePoint folders will no longer have the GUID appended to them.

How to Fix Existing Folders

It may be the case that you have lots of existing SharePoint folders that are configured in the default manner, but you want to look at “tidying” them up. Simply renaming the SharePoint folder will not work, as CRM/D365E stores “pointers” to each individual folder setup for Document Management, containing a partial URL link; a link that will become broken if anything is modified within SharePoint. To correctly fix your folders and not break anything, you will need to do the following:

  1. Locate the Document Location record within CRM/D365E and modify the Relative URL value to remove the GUID value (e.g. the Document Location record for Test Co5_B3D5C8DFDB77E51181023863BB357C38 should be updated to have a Relative URL value of Test Co5). You may receive a warning that the URL does not exist, which can be safely disregarded.
  2. Rename the folder in SharePoint to match the updated Relative URL value from above.

This could potentially be a laborious task, depending on the number of Document Locations involved. To ease you in your journey, I would recommend digging out the CRM/D365E SDK & the .NET Client API for SharePoint to iteratively update all Document Locations and ditto for all folders within SharePoint online, based on a .csv/spreadsheet input.

Having the ability to make your SharePoint folders look more visually appealing is nice, but keep in mind the following…

By storing a GUID within each folder name, the application can always ensure that the correct folder can be linked back to a CRM record. By implication, this also facilitates situations where duplicate record names are allowed within your environment (for example, you could have two Account records both called Test Company Ltd). By overriding the above setting within the application, you lose the ability to support duplicate folder names; instead, the application will resolve back to any existing folder that matches the Name of the record, essentially becoming a document repository for 2 records as opposed to 1.

An example can better demonstrate this. Below is a test Account record that has been setup for Document Management Рwith a few test documents saved within and a Document folder successfully configured in SharePoint called My Test Account:

When we then go and create a brand new¬†Account¬†record with the same name –¬†My Test Account – and go to configure Document Management, we are asked to confirm the creation of a Folder with the same name as the one already setup:

Once confirmed, instead of seeing a blank folder, all of the test documents set up on the similarly named record are visible – because the application is pointing to the folder above:

It is highly unlikely that you would allow duplicate record names in the first place within your CRM/D365E instance (particularly for entity types such as Account), so this may be a concern that requires little notice. However, be sure to perform a full analysis of the all the record types that you are hoping to use with Document Management, as there is no way to fine tune the global setting to accommodate specific entities Рit is all or nothing.

Conclusions or Wot I Think

Keeping things looking tidy and non-technical are endeavours that need to drive any successful software deployment. End users who exposed to strange looking, “techie” stuff as part of working with a system day in day out may soon start to lose faith in a system, hampering user adoption and faith that it is fit for purpose. Removing GUID’s from a SharePoint folder can obviously present some serious technical problems, depending on the nature of your deployment; but it is arguably something that you should consider if you want to ensure that end users feel that their SharePoint folders are “correctly” named (i.e. do not contain superfluous information). As with anything in IT, proper testing must be carried out for all possible scenarios before rolling out a feature change like this and, assuming your business ticks all of the boxes for safely removing GUID’s from your SharePoint folders, it is definitely something to be considered seriously.

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