Office 365 groups have been a recurring topic of the blog in recent months – we’ve seen how we can force Office 365 to use custom domains when creating groups for the very first time and how you can straightforwardly integrate an Office 365 Group within Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement. With this in mind, there is little point in providing a detailed description of what they are and how they can be used; suffice to say, if you are wanting to collaborate closely with internal/external colleagues for a particular project or department, Office 365 Groups are an excellent candidate to consider.

One of the cornerstones of Office 365 Groups is the ability for all conversations to be tracked via the use of a dedicated shared mailbox. This perhaps explains why the Office 365 portal will refuse to let you add any user within your organisation who does not have an Exchange Online license assigned to them. Case in point – let’s assume we have a user account with no such license assigned to them on the Office 365 portal:

When attempting to add this user into an Office 365 group, we get a message to let us know No match was found for the user account entered and, as a consequence, it cannot be added to the group:

From this, you can perhaps make the assumption that Office 365 groups are not supported at all for users who do not have a mailbox. This is notwithstanding the fact there are several different business scenarios that may necessitate this requirement:

  • A kiosk/”light-use” account may require access to the group to upload documents and manage the SharePoint site.
  • Integration with external applications may be required, stipulating the need for a service account to authenticate with the group to retrieve/add content dynamically.
  • The need to configure an account for external users to access, that is sufficiently locked down and inexpensive to maintain.

Fortunately, as with many other things relating to Office 365, we can get around this limitation within the Office 365 portal by resorting to PowerShell and adding the John Doe user account above to the Group.

The first step towards achieving this is to boot up a PowerShell window. Make sure you have access to this on your machine of choice then, after opening the application using the Run as administrator option, execute the following script:

##Set Execution Policy to Remote Signed - required to fully execute script

Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

##Connect to Exchange Online. Enter administrator details when prompted.

$UserCredential = Get-Credential

$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/ -Credential $UserCredential -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection

Import-PSSession $Session

##Add the non-mailbox user to the Office 365 Group. Substitute the Links value with the username of the account to add.

Add-UnifiedGroupLinks -Identity "Test Office 365 Group" -LinkType Members -Links john.doe@domain.com

##Confirm that the user has been added successfully by returning the Group member list

Get-UnifiedGroupLinks -Identity "Test Office 365 Group" -LinkType Members

##Cleanup by disconnecting from Exchange Online

Remove-PSSession $Session

The penultimate command will make something similar to the below appear in the console window. Interestingly, note that the John.Doe test user has a RecipientType value of User:

Now that the user has been added successfully, they will be able to access the SharePoint site for the group by navigating to the SharePoint library URL. This will look similar to the below and can be grabbed by logging in as another user who has the RecipientType value of UserMailbox and navigating to the Groups SharePoint site:

https://<Your On Microsoft domain prefix>.sharepoint.com/sites/<Your Office 365 Group Name/

Note that this will be on the only way the non-mailbox user can access the site. For example, there will be no link to SharePoint within Office 365 to guide you to the above location. After logging in, you should be greeted with a window similar to the one below:

The John Doe “light-use” account, as referenced above, will have full access to everything that is accessible within SharePoint concerning the Office 365 Group, such as:

  • The Home/News Page
  • Shared Documents Folder (“Documents“)
  • Shared OneNote (“Notebook“)
  • All Site Pages
  • Planner (navigated to via the following link: https://tasks.office.com/<Your Office 365 Primary domain>/en-GB/Home/Planner/)

Conversely, the following features will be inaccessible (due to requiring a Mailbox):

  • Conversations
  • Shared Calendar

If for example, you attempt to navigate to Conversations within SharePoint, you will get the following error message:

This is, perhaps, a small price to pay for what ends up to be a pretty feature-rich experience that can be given to additional users within your organisation at virtually no cost. Perhaps another good excuse to start rolling out Office 365 Groups across your tenant in the near future 🙂

With the dizzying array of cloud-hosted applications and database systems available to IT system administrators today (often deployable at a few button clicks), you may be forgiven for thinking that Microsoft Access has joined the ranks of InfoPath, Visual FoxPro and other semi-legendary deprecated applications. Far from it – Access is still a mainstay within most Office 365 subscriptions today, alongside Word, Excel etc. What’s more, if you are looking to develop a very simple application to be utilised within your organisation, you would be hard-pressed to find an equivalent product at the same price point that would do the job as well. Here are just a few reasons on why Access is great.

  • It has the ability to connect to a wide variety of data sources – SQL, SharePoint and others – as well as letting you store data within Access itself.
  • The application contains rich customisation options for forms, buttons and other controls, enabling you to tailor the interface to suit a wide variety of business requirements.
  • Access has full support for Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), giving you the further potential to integrate complex logic when building your Access application.

Although there was some concerning news recently regarding Access within SharePoint Online, that looked like the writing on the wall for Access, quite the opposite effect seems to be happening. The application is being continually updated within Microsoft, with one of the latest of these updates catching my attention:

Last November, we shared our plan to add a set of modern data connectors that will enable Office ProPlus customers to expand what is possible in their organizations.

Today, we are pleased to announce the addition of two new connectors in our portfolio: Microsoft Dynamics and Salesforce. These two connectors are rolling out to customers with Office 365 ProPlus, E3, or E5 plans.

To clarify, Microsoft Dynamics in this context refers to the Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement (Dynamics CRM) application, and not any other product within the newly revamped Dynamics 365 family. Getting started with the new data connectors is fairly easy, and may be useful for your business to look at more closely. With this in mind, let’s take a look at how to setup a straightforward Access application that links with Dynamics 365.

Before we begin…

At the time of writing, the new data connectors are only available for those who on the First Release branch of Office ProPlus, something which has to be explicitly enabled on the Office 365 Admin centre. As part of this, you may need to reinstall your Office applications (like I did) to ensure that this kicks in correctly.

Once you’ve verified that you’re on the correct Access version, you can then proceed to create your Dynamics 365 “powered” Access app…

Open up Access and create a brand new Blank database app called Contact Management.accdb, saving it in a location of your choosing:

A blank Access app will be created with an empty Table (this can be safely deleted). Navigate to the External Data tab on the Ribbon and select the From Dynamics 365 (onlineexternal data source:

A pop-up will appear, asking for your Dynamics 365 application URL and how you want to store the data within Access – take a one-time copy of it (Import the source data into a new table in the current database) or connect directly (Link to the data source by creating a linked table). Select the 2nd option, which I would always recommend to select:

Access will then attempt to retrieve a list of the Entities within the application. You may also be asked to log in using your Office 365 credentials, but based on my testing, it seemed to automatically pick these up from my currently logged in Office 365 account for activation – which is nice 🙂

The Link Tables window will then return a list of the entities that you are able to select. In this example, select Contacts and then press OK.

Access will then begin importing the table definitions and the underlying data, which can take a few moments. It is worth noting that Access will also automatically import tables for each N:1 entity relationship for your chosen Entity. This is to allow you to effectively query for “friendly name” information, as opposed to returning the rather ugly looking Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) values for each relationship:

With our data successfully imported, we can then start to build out a Form to enable users to interact with and change records. The quickest way of doing this is via the Form Wizard, which can be found on the Create tab:

By following the Wizard’s instructions. we can select the fields we want on our new form…

…our preferred layout…

…and then, finally, our form name:

Clicking on Finish will load up our newly created Form. From there, we can run a test by adding a Mobile Number value to the Marissa Burnett sample Contact record and then verify this appears successfully on Dynamics 365 after saving:

Conclusions or Wot I Think

The role of Access within the wider context of Microsoft’s offerings is one that has been increasingly open to question in recent years. The debut of exciting new solutions such as PowerApps and Dynamics 365 for Business, does make you start to think whether Access will be for the “chop” in the near future. By adding the new Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement and Salesforce connectors, along with the other updates that are continually being rolled out for the application, Microsoft makes it clear that for, the time-being, Access is very much here to stay. The reasons for this can be perhaps garnered from my opening comments – it still remains a very versatile way of building quick to deploy, database vendor agnostic solutions that are tailored for desktop use within businesses of any size globally. Another reason for its mainstay – and the release of these new connectors – could be seen as a stealthy means of getting organisations slowly moved across to solutions like Dynamics 365, without the need of moving everything across in one go.

Whatever the reason(s), we can be encouraged by the fact that Access is very much being actively developed, even within the current landscape of varying CRM/ERP solutions. And, what’s more, it’s very cool to be able to say that Dynamics 365 for Customer Engagement is Access compatible 🙂

We saw previously on the blog some of the great features that you have at your disposal when using Office 365 Groups in conjunction with Dynamics CRM/Dynamics 365 for Enterprise. When deployed prudently, they can massively enhance what is traditionally possible via distribution groups and give internal/external users a better way to collaborate with content, as opposed to a mountain of email attachments. As I cautiously hinted towards in the above post, some thought should go into how you go about rolling out Office 365 Groups across your organisation, which should inevitably include internal testing. By doing this, you can highlight a particular functionality quirk that you will more than likely need to address before issuing a general rollout.

When you first go to create an Office 365 Group, you will notice that the domain address of the newly created group mailbox has defaulted to the onmicrosoft.com domain for your Office 365 tenant, instead of any bespoke domain you may have setup on your tenant:

You would think that this is caused by the fact that the Default Domain for the tenant is still set to the onmicrosoft.com domain, as we can see below:

However, after changing this accordingly, we are still forced to create a Group email address that utilises the onmicrosoft.com domain:

Rather frustrating! Fortunately, there is a way in which we can get around the issue, which involves two steps if you have existing Office 365 Groups that need renaming:

  1. Modify the Email Address Policy for your tenant via PowerShell to force new Groups to use your desired domain.
  2. Update the SMTP address of all existing groups via PowerShell.

Both of these steps will now be demonstrated, but be sure to have PowerShell installed on your machine first before you begin.

Connecting to your Office 365 tenant

Start your PowerShell client as an Administrator (Run as Administrator option on Windows) and execute the following command first to ensure all subsequent scripts run correctly:

Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

You should receive a prompt similar to the below:

Press to proceed

Now we are ready to connect to Exchange Online, using the following cmdlets:

$UserCredential = Get-Credential
$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/ -Credential $UserCredential -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection
Import-PSSession $Session

You’ll be prompted to enter credentials to authenticate:

Make sure the credentials used have the relevant privileges on Office 365 and then hit OK. After a few moments, you should see a window similar to the below, which indicates that you have successfully connected and have all the Exchange Online cmdlets at your disposal:

Set Default Email Policy for Office 365 Groups

Modifying Office 365 to use a different domain when creating Office 365 Groups requires invocation of the New-EmailAddressPolicy cmdlet, a broad brush command that is useful for a number of different Exchange management scenarios. The command can be specifically tailored to create a policy applicable to Office 365 Groups, basically telling your tenant which SMTP domain to use when creating new Groups:

New-EmailAddressPolicy -Name Groups -IncludeUnifiedGroupRecipients -EnabledEmailAddressTemplates "SMTP:@mydomain.com" -Priority 1

You can tell if the command has executed successfully if you see something similar to the below in your PowerShell window:

Next, we can then verify that Office 365 has detected the change by creating a new Group and verifying that the Email address value reflects our desired domain:

Rename Existing Office 365 Group

Assuming you are just starting out with Office 365 Groups, the simplest way of renaming your existing groups would be to recreate them. This may not work if they are already being utilised, given the level of effort involved in migrating existing content across to a new group. In this scenario, there is an additional cmdlet we can rely upon to change the SMTP address of our group to our desired domain:

Set-UnifiedGroup -Identity "Test Office 365 Group" -PrimarySmtpAddress test@mydomain.com

PowerShell will only return a message in case of an error, so to verify our changes have taken place, we must again return to Office 365 to confirm that the new SMTP address is in place:

With this now updated, email messages should flow successfully to the new Group SMTP address.

Conclusions or Wot I Think

It is rather strange that there are no obvious means of specifying which default domain should be used with newly created Office 365 groups, nor at the fact that there is any way for the user to override their choice so they can select a domain that is available on the tenant. As discussed at the start of this post, this situation provides an excellent argument for ensuring that proper processes are followed for the introduction of all new technologies within the business. Whilst exciting and innovative solutions should always be duly considered and not hampered from being rolled out, it is crucial that an appropriate amount of time is allocated for thorough testing. The last thing you want to do, in reference to this situation, is to cause irritation to end users by not giving them the ability to present a professional and correct domain name for their Office 365 Groups; by running through some test scenarios and involving end users as part of this process, where possible, you can help to prevent issues resulting from a roll out and (hopefully!) enthuse colleagues within your organisation at the new piece of technology that is being introduced.

I was recently involved in deploying my first ever Office 365 Group. I already had a good theoretical understanding of them, thanks to the curriculum for the Business Applications MCSA, but I had not yet seen how they perform in action. The best way of summing them up is that they are, in effect, a distribution group on steroids. As well as getting a shared mailbox that can be used for all communications relating to the group’s purpose, they also support the following features:

  • Shared Calendar
  • SharePoint Document Site
  • Shared OneNote document
  • Shared Planner

In a nutshell, they can be seen as an excellent vehicle for bringing together the diverse range of features available as part of your Office 365 subscription. What helps further is that they are tightly integrated as part of the tools that you likely already use each day – for example, they can be accessed and worked with from the Outlook desktop client on and Web Access (OWA) portal.

Given that this feature is a very Office 365 centric component, the natural question emerges as to why an exam for Dynamics CRM/Dynamics 365 for Enterprise (CRM/D365E) would want to test your knowledge of them. Since the release of Dynamics CRM 2016 Update 1, you now have the option of integrating Office 365 Groups with the application, to provide a mechanism for easily working with groups from within the CRM/D365E web interface, effectively providing a “bridge” for non-CRM/D365E users who are using Office 365.

You may be pleased to hear that the steps involved in getting setup with Office 365 Groups in CRM/D365E are remarkably straightforward. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to get up and running with this feature within your business:

Microsoft provides a managed solution that contains everything you need to get going with Office 365 Groups, and this is made available as a Preferred Solution. These are installed from the Dynamics 365 Administration Center by navigating to your instance, selecting the little pen icon next to Solutions and clicking on the Office 365 Groups record on the list that is displayed:

Click on the Install button and then accept the Terms of Service – as Office 365 Groups creates an intrinsic link between your CRM/D365E and Office 365 tenant, it is only natural that data will need to be shared between both, so there are no major concerns in accepting this:

The solution will take a couple of minutes to install, and you can safely refresh the window to monitor progress. Once installed, the Settings sitemap area will be updated with a new button – Office 365 Groups:

Clicking into this will navigate you to the Office 365 Groups Integration Settings page, which allows you start configuring the entities you wish to use to utilise with Office 365 Groups:

For reference purposes, the default out of the box entities that can be used with this feature are as follows:

  • Account
  • Competitor
  • Contact
  • Contract
  • Case
  • Invoice
  • Lead
  • Opportunity
  • Product
  • Quote
  • Sales Literature

You may be wondering if it is possible to enable additional entities for use with Office 365 Groups. At the time of writing, only the system entities recorded above and custom entities can be used with Office 365 Groups.

Now that we know how to get CRM/D365E setup for Office 365 Groups, let’s look at how it works when set up for the Account entity:

Going back to the Office 365 Groups Integration Settings (if you have closed it down), click on the Add entity button to enable a drop-down control, containing a list of the entities referenced above. Select Account and, when you are ready to proceed, click Publish all to enable this entity for Office 365 Groups functionality:

For this example, the Auto Create button is left blank. I would recommend that this setting is always used, so as to prevent the creation of unnecessary Office 365 Groups, that may get named incorrectly as a consequence (you’ll see why this has the potential to occur in a few moments).

Once enabled, when you navigate to an existing Account record, you will see a new icon on the Related Records sitemap area:

After clicking on this, you are then asked to either Create a new group – with the ability to specify its name – or to Search for an existing group. The second option is particularly handy if you have already been using Office 365 Groups and wish to retroactively tie these back to CRM/D365E:

For this example, we are going to create a new group. The process can take a while (as indicated below) so now may be a good opportunity to go make a brew 🙂

Leaving the screen open will eventually force a refresh, at which point your new group will appear, with all the different options at your disposal:

With your group now up and running, you can start uploading documents, configure the shared calendar and fine-tune the group’s settings to suit your purposes. Here are some handy tips to bear in mind when using the group with CRM/D365E:

  • Just because the group is linked up with CRM/D365E doesn’t mean that you have to be a user from this application to access the group. This is one of the great things about utilising Office 365 Groups with CRM/D365E, as standard Office 365 users can join and work with the group without issue. The only thing you have to remember is that the Office 365 user has to have the appropriate license on Office 365 – as indicated by Microsoft, any subscription that gives a user an Exchange Online mailbox and SharePoint Online access will suffice.
  • Remember that the ConversationsNotebook and Documents features are not in any way linked with the equivalent CRM/D365E feature. For example, any Conversation threads will not appear within the Social Pane as an activity; you will need to navigate to the Office 365 Group page to view these.
  • Utilising Office 365 Groups as an end-user requires that you have the appropriate security role access. If you do not, then you may be greeted with the following when attempting to open an Office 365 Group within the application:

That’s right – a whole heap of nothing! 🙂 To fix this, you will need to go into the users Security Role and ensure that they have Organization-level privilege on the ISV Extensions privilege, as indicated below:

Conclusions or Wot I Think

Office 365 Groups present a natural choice when working as part of large-scale teams or projects – especially when they are internally based. They can also be a good fit for when you wish to liaise with 3rd party organisations, thanks to the ability to grant Guest access to external accounts. Having the ability to then tie these groups back within CRM/D365E is useful, but I do wonder whether they are a good match for all of the record types that Microsoft suggests in the list above. Certainly, Account records are a justifiable fit if you are working with an organisation to deliver continuous services or multiple projects. I doubt highly, however, that you want to go to the trouble of creating a shared document repository for a new Lead record right from the bat – particularly if your CRM/D365E deployment is more focused towards B2C selling. You may be tempted to over-excitedly roll out Office 365 Groups carte blanche across your CRM/D365E deployment, but I would caution against this. Don’t forget that the creation of a new Office 365 Group will result in additional overhead when managing your Exchange Online mailbox lists and SharePoint sites, as well as having long-term storage implications for the latter. Acting prudently, you can identify a good business case for enabling specific entities for use with Office 365 Groups and ensure that you manage your entire Office 365 deployment in the most effective manner possible.